NASA

Hubble Space Telescope watches stunning supernova fade over a full year


Fortunately for scientists, the massive stellar explosion, called supernova 2018gv, took place 70 million light-years away, and the Hubble Space Telescope was in prime position to watch the lightshow.


A Hubble Space Telescope image shows a bright supernova to the left located in a galaxy called NGC 2525.


(Image credit: NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU) and the SH0ES team)The supernova occurred in a large spiral galaxy called NGC 2525, toward the outer edge of one of the galaxy's prominent arms, where a white dwarf — itself the superdense remnant of a dead star — and its companion star circled each other.


But as they danced across their corner of the universe, the white dwarf was gradually glomming onto gas, pulling it away from its companion and growing larger.


An annotated version of the Hubble Space Telescope image of a bright supernova offers a sense of scale for the galaxy NGC 2525.


(Image credit: NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU) and the SH0ES team)The white dwarf exploded, releasing in just a few days as much energy as our sun does in a few billion years, becoming by far the brightest thing in the galaxy.






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